Big Pharma and Big Tobacco

Big Pharma and Big Tobacco

Opioid Addiction

President Trump has declared the opioid addiciton crisis a national emergency, but nothing is changing. If it really is a national emergency, why has nothing happened to stop it? President Trump declared a 90 day public health emergency to mobilize the federal government. Unfortunately, that declaration expired with barely a flutter.

A senior White House official disputed the assessment of inaction concerning opioid addiction. The official claims that the declaration has allowed the president to draw further attention to this emergency. The declaration has enabled federal agencies to really change their focus. The official also added that an effective media campaign takes time and not to judge to quickly.

West Virginia, has the highest drug overdose death rate due to opioid addiction in the country. Public Health Commissioner Rahul Gupta hasn’t seen any significant change under Trump’s emergency order. West Virginia and other state have not seen additional funding nor resources.

Manufacturers of opioids much like big tobacco hid their addiction literature from consumers and the prescribing doctors. Opioid addiction has increased substantially since 1999.Opioid addiction now claims roughly more than 115 lives every day. Even more terrifying, is that 75 percent of those abusing opioids, report that there first interaction with the drug was through a valid prescription.

Multiple lawsuits have been filed and the man responsible for taking down big tobacco has called pharmaceutical companies "pretty evil." The lawsuits filed allege that the pharmaceutical companies lied about the addictive properties of their drugs in the name of the almighty dollar.

I tend to believe him. There are promotional videos that rate the addiction rate much less than one percent.The assertion that addiction rate was less than one percent is a lie, and the pharmaceutical companies knew that it was a lie. In fact, the sales training focused on telling doctors that less than one percent of patients became addicted. Not a single study could support their assertions.

Daniel S. Garner
Written by Daniel S. Garner