You Should Sue

You Should Sue

When an injury occurs, you should sue. There is a new burden thrust onto the person injured and also a burden to society. When our ancestors were trying to decide who should bear that new burden, it decided on the person who caused the injury. Wouldn't it be an injustice for the injured party to carry that new burden? To not only have to deal with the injury but also the monetary consequences of that injury.  Most people agree that it would be unjust for an injured person to carry that burden. For that reason, tort law was created. Tort law was created to help alleviate the injured's burden and help society move forward.

Many people believe that a person should not be punished for an honest mistake. I can understand that thinking, but that doesn't take into the account the new burden forced on the injured party. Many times people have medical bills and extra care that are completely unexpected. If you were in an accident that caused you to need 24 hour nursing care, who should pay for that? While the cause of the accident wasn't intentional, you certainly didn't cause it, but you're having to live with the consequences.

Most people don't have sympathy for the driver who caused an accident while texting, but they often do when a doctor causes an injury. The question is why? The answer largely comes from a misunderstanding of what it takes to sue a doctor and why you should sue. A successful lawsuit against a doctor requires proving that the doctor's actions were below the accepted standard of care. Below the standard of care is when a mistake, is not just a mistake, but a mistake that the medical community has deemed unacceptable.  It's a mistake that the doctor should have known not to make.

But again, who should bear the burden of the injury? If the doctor's actions causes someone to go blind, should that person bear the cost of that injury? Or should it be the person who gets to watch the sunset on their way home? The person injured's life will never be the same.

It's important to realize that I'm not saying the person who caused the injury is a bad person. I'm NOT saying that the tortfeasor intentionally hurt someone. If the injury was intentional, we would be talking about a criminal act and jail time. We wouldn't be discussing how best to restore the injured party. Put simply, the defendant committed a mistake that breached a duty of care owed to others and they should be held responsible for that breach.

 
Daniel S. Garner
Written by Daniel S. Garner